A bunch of macadamia nuts in the husk and macadamia leaves arranged on top of macadamia nuts. The green husks around the nuts are just starting to open and reveal the nuts inside.

Macadamia nuts, although not usually an everyday food, are often found in baked goods, including cakes, cookies, muffins, and even trail mix. Are they safe for dogs? Absolutely not! In fact, macadamia nuts are often listed as among the top human foods to avoid giving your dog. The consequences of eating macadamia nuts include vomiting, ataxia, weakness, hyperthermia, and depression.

Veterinarians and researchers have not identified what causes this particular food to be toxic to dogs; it’s perfectly safe for humans and has not been seen to affect cats. As with grapes and raisins, we just do not know the specific toxin or mechanism of biological action that causes the signs of poisoning. But what we do know is that even a small amount of the nuts can cause severe symptoms. A dog can show symptoms from eating as little as 1/10 of an ounce per roughly 2 pounds of body weight. So, if you’re thinking of giving your dog just a little taste, don’t.

Symptoms of Macadamia Nut Poisoning in Dogs

The most common sign is weakness, especially in the hind legs. Other symptoms include lethargy, diarrhea, vomiting, tremors, and fever. Some cases are mild, showing only a few symptoms, and resolve themselves within a few days. However, there are serious cases involving constant shaking, high fever, and an inability to walk. If you suspect your dog may have eaten even a small amount of macadamia nuts, consult your veterinarian immediately.

Treatment of Macadamia Nut Poisoning in Dogs

First things first: If you suspect your dog has eaten even one macadamia nut, call your vet as soon as possible. If caught early enough, vomiting can be induced, but only after speaking with your veterinarian or the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center (888-426-4435).

Your vet may recommend close at-home observation and additionally, activated charcoal and/or a cathartic to help the nuts speed through your dog’s digestive system. More serious cases will require care and treatment at a veterinary hospital. If your dog ingested a large amount of the nuts or if another toxicity, chocolate, for example, is involved, treatment will be more aggressive. The good news is that generally if treated, a dog will recover fully and return to normal within several days.

Source: akc

Images: getty

Do you like this article? If yes take moment to share with your friends. We would love to hear your comments, leave us one below!

Leave a Reply

Sign Up for Our Newsletters

Get notified of the best deals on our WordPress themes.

You May Also Like

From The Vet: 3 Things Every Chihuahua Owner Should Watch For

Chihuahuas are extremely popular. They are all the fun of a bigger…

Why is My Chihuahua Not Eating? (The Top 6 Reasons!)

Is your dog not eating? If you’ve ever had a dog who…

Why is My Chihuahua Gagging?

The “gag reflex,” also known as the laryngeal spasm or pharyngeal reflex,…

Managing Your Chihuahua’s Destructive Behavior

Prepare to lose at least one good pair of shoes. Chihuahua puppies…